Contact Information

By Phone:
UK: 0800 635 5555
Ireland: 1800 818 816
By Fax:
00 1 604 669 6855
By Mail:
LensWay.co.uk
24-28 St. Leonards Road
Windsor, Berkshire
SL4 3BB

Frequently Asked Questions

Ordering

  • Ordering Online

    Glasses

    Find Your Frames:

    1. Choose your frame style by clicking on the "Eyeglasses" tab or "Sunglasses" tab found at the top of the homepage. If you know the exact frame you want, enter it in the Search box found at the top right-hand side of the homepage.
    2. You can then further refine your search by using the "Shop by Gender", "Shop by Brand" or "Shop by Style" menus on the left side of the page, select the various "Refine your search" boxes and your search will automatically be updated. All of the frames that match your specifications will then be displayed.
    3. Once you have chosen the perfect frames, you will be asked to enter your prescription (Rx) information. Pay close attention to the size of the frame you have chosen to ensure you receive the best fit!
    4. Now select how you use your eyeglasses; Single Vision (distance, everyday use), Reading or Progressive (distance and reading in one, a.k.a no line bifocal). Note: not all frames are eligible for progressive lenses.
    5. At this point you will need to input your prescription. Don't forget to select your PD. Once you have made your selections, click "Select Lens".
    6. You now only have three more steps before your order is complete:
      • Step 1: Select Your Lenses - If you are not sure which lens best suits you, check out our recommendations below each lens option.
      • Step 2: Lens Coatings - All of our lenses include an anti-glare coating, anti-scratch coating and UV protection.
      • Step 3: Lens Tints (optional) - We have 3 sunglass tints and 4 fashion tints. Please be aware that our 1.67 and 1.74 lenses and all Progressive lenses are not tintable.
    7. Purchase Your Glasses

    8. Once you are happy with your selections, click "Add to Cart".
    9. Upon completion of your order you will see a confirmation page with an order number. This will let you know your order has been received and is on its way. You will be sent an email copy of this confirmation.
    10. Payment options will be described on your invoice. You can pay online with a credit card/PayPal or by phone with a credit card.

    Contact Lenses

    Find Your Contact Lenses:

    • Choose your contact lenses by clicking on the "Contact Lenses" tab found at the top of the homepage. If you know the exact lens you want, enter it in the Search box found at the top right-hand side of the homepage or click on its picture.
    • You can then further refine your search by using the "Shop by Brand", "Customer Favorites" or "Shop by Type" menus on the left side of the page.
    • Once you have chosen your contact lenses, you will be asked to enter your prescription (Rx) information.
    • Purchase Your Contact Lenses

    • Once you have entered your Rx information, click "Add to Cart".
    • Upon completion of your order you will see a confirmation page with an order number. This will let you know your order has been received and is on its way. You will be sent an email copy of this confirmation.
    • Payment options will be described on your invoice. You can pay online with a credit card/PayPal or by phone with a credit card.

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  • Ordering By Phone

    To order by phone, please call Customer Care toll free at UK: 0800 635 5555 Ireland: 1800 818 816.

    For Customer Care Hours, please see Hours of Operation.
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  • Refilling Your Order

    At LensWay we make it easy for you to refill your order when you need more contact lenses. There are three different ways to quickly refill your last order:

    1. Sign up for our Autorefill program. It's quick, easy, and will ensure you never run out of contacts again! Click here to find out more.
    2. Click on the refill link that we will send you by email when it's time to refill your order. This will take you to your personalized refill page where you can quickly reorder your lenses.
    3. Log in to your account and view your order history. Here you can easily re-order any of your previous orders!
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  • Special/Custom Order

    Having trouble finding the type of contact lenses you are prescribed? It could be because you need a special order lenses.

    If this is the case, we can order them for you as we offer a wide variety of custom and made-to-order lenses. Please contact us at (UK) 0800 635 5555 (IE) 1 800 818 816 for assistance. We will be happy to guide you through the ordering process.

    Please be advised that pricing and availability vary depending on your particular prescription. Made-to-order lenses can take up to 4-6 weeks before shipping.
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  • Payment

    We accept the following credit cards online and by phone: Visa, Diners, MasterCard, Maestro, American Express and Solo.

    Paying Online: Use your credit card or PayPal account

    Paying by Phone: Please call Customer Care toll free at (UK) 0800 635 5555 (IE) 1 800 818 816
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Shipping information

  • Eyeglasses

    We are proud to say that the majority of our glasses are shipped within 72 hours.

    Yet, as our eyeglasses are custom made for each individual, they may take up to 7 business days to be made before shipping out depending on your particular order.
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  • Sunglasses

    As we are continually taking stock to ensure our warehouse is ready for your sunglass orders, we are able to process your order the day we receive it and ship it either that day or the following day.

    Orders received between 11:30 pm (GMT) on Friday and 7:00 pm (GMT) Sunday will be processed Monday and shipped as soon as possible (pending availability of the sunglasses ordered). Processing generally takes 2 days.
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  • Contact Lenses

    If your contact lens prescription falls into the most common parameters, we are able to process your order the day we receive it and ship it either that day or the following day.

    Orders received between 11:30 pm (GMT) on Friday and 7:00 pm (GMT) Sunday will be processed Monday and shipped as soon as possible (pending availability of the contact lenses ordered). Processing generally takes 2 days.

    Please keep in mind that if you order a less common prescription it may take slightly longer to process, especially toric lenses (which often have to be special-ordered and can take up to an additional 5 business days to process). We appreciate your patience.
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  • Shipping Methods, Locations and Prices

    Your order may include a 5% Handling and Insurance surcharge to ensure your product is safely delivered to your door. This insurance also covers you if your contact lens prescription changes. If this is the case, you can return your unexpired, unopened boxes and we will ship you new lenses to match your new prescription.

    United Kingdom

    • Royal Mail: maximum of 4-10 days after processing is £3.99
    • FedEx: maximum of 2-3 days after processing is £9.99

    We apologize for the inconvenience, but we are not able to send FedEx deliveries to PO boxes. FedEx Overnight or 2-Day delivery is not available for International destinations at this time.
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  • Duties and Taxes

    All packages shipped outside of the United Kingdom may incur extra duty charges. LensWay is not responsible for any sales taxes, customs duties or other taxes charged by your customs department. To avoid any unexpected charges, please contact the customs organization in your home country regarding these policies. For orders to Japan, due to Customs regulations, we are only able to ship a maximum quantity of 4 boxes per order and apologize for any inconvenience.


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  • Order Tracking

    We will send you an email when your order ships including your tracking number and instructions for how to track your order online from your carrier's website. You can track the status of your order, if it has shipped in the last 30 days, on our website. Just click on "Track My Order" at the top of this page.
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Contact Us

Policies

  • Return Policy

    Eyeglasses and Sunglasses

    Returning items? Even though we have fewer returns than traditional optical stores, if you need to return your order for any reason, just make sure it's within 365 days of purchase. We’ll even pay the return shipping. Simply follow the steps below and then call our Customer Care Team at (UK) 0800 635 5555 (IE) 1 800 818 816 and they will offer a pre-paid postage stamp.

    • Secure your merchandise in the original packaging, if available, or any sturdy box, and enclose a note detailing the reason for the return with your Order Number. Please DO NOT return your glasses in an envelope.
    • Please allow 2-3 weeks for your store credit or refund to be issued.

    Contact Lenses

    Returning Items? Even though we have fewer returns than traditional optical stores, if you need to return your order for any reason, just make sure it's within 365 days of purchase. Simply follow the steps below and then call our Customer Care Team at (UK) 0800 635 5555 (IE) 1 800 818 816 and they will offer a pre-paid postage stamp.

    • Secure your merchandise in the original packaging, if available, or any sturdy box, and enclose a note detailing the reason for the return with your Order Number. Please DO NOT return contact lens boxes in an envelope.
    • Please allow 2-3 weeks for your store credit or refund to be issued.

    Defective Lenses?

    • We guarantee that all of our lenses are factory sealed. If you have a problem with any lens purchased from us at any time or suspect they are defective, please discontinue wearing them and contact us immediately. If your lenses are determined to be defective by the manufacturer, we will issue a store credit in full.

    Exchanging?

    • If your prescription changes, we will exchange unexpired and unopened boxes or vials of contacts.
    • If you have an exchange for a higher amount from your original purchase, please provide your credit card number.
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  • Security Policy

    We take the security of your information very seriously. Our e-commerce system uses the latest SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) technology (the industry standard for encryption technology). It is used to create a secure transaction environment for commerce on the Internet. If your browser and local network support the use of encrypted data transmissions, our Secure Checkout mode locks all information (i.e., your credit card number) passed from you to LensWay in an encrypted envelope, making it extremely difficult to be intercepted by an unauthorized party. It is the same level of encryption technology that NASA and the CIA use. This ensures that your credit card information remains totally secure.

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  • Privacy Policy

    We respect your privacy. That's why we will not disclose, rent or sell your email address, or other contact information to any other company. We collect this information in order to be able to process your order and to offer you special deals when it is time to refill your order. Should you ever wish to be removed from our email list, we will process your request immediately.
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General

  • How The Eye Works

    Eyes do not actually see objects; they see the light reflected by objects. When these light rays enter the eye, they are absorbed and then converted into electrical signals by retinal nerves.

    In a person with normal vision, light rays enter the eye through the cornea (also known as the window of the eye), then are focused with the help of the crystalline lens. The crystalline lens is located behind the pupil at a point directly on the retina (the light sensitive nervous tissue at the back of the eyeball). These signals are subsequently sent to the brain where they are interpreted as visual images.

    Much like the way a camera works, when the eye is working you are able to see a clear picture. When the eye is not working properly, the picture is not as clear (there is a refractive error). Only about four in ten people have normal visual acuity. Refractive errors can be corrected with the help of eyeglasses or contact lenses.
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  • Common Eye Conditions

    Besides refractive errors that necessitate vision correction, there are a few common eye conditions that people can have. They are astigmatism, glaucoma, myopia, hyperopia and presbyopia.

    Astigmatism is a condition in which the cornea's curvature is asymmetrical. Sometimes this is described as the eye being shaped more like a football than a baseball. The eye is therefore unable to focus clearly. This can be corrected with toric contact lenses.

    Glaucoma is a condition in which the pressure inside the eye is elevated because of excessive amounts of fluid (aqueous humor). This can damage the optic nerve and cause a range of impairment, from loss of peripheral vision, or blindness. Chronic glaucoma usually begins in people over the age of 40.

    Myopia is also called nearsightedness. People with this condition can see clearly up close but not at a distance.

    Hyperopia is also called farsightedness. People with this condition can see clearly at a distance but not up close.

    Presbyopia is a condition that usually affects people 40 and over. People with usually normal vision find it more and more difficult to read and do detailed work unless they're very close up. People with presbyopia can find help in the use of reading glasses, or bifocal or multifocal contact lenses.

  • Glossary of Common Eye-Related Terms
    • Aspheric - a thin contact lens with gradually changing power
    • Astigmatism - condition in which the cornea has an irregular curvature, often but not always occurring with hyperopia or myopia
    • Axis - precise location of the point where correction is needed on the eye
    • Balance - term used to describe when one eye has little or no vision (Ex., OD: -5.50, OS: BAL)
    • Base Curve - a number between 7.0 and 10.0 or a phrase, such as steep or flat, that describes the curvature of the eye
    • Bifocal - contact lenses with two or more viewing zones
    • Cleaning Solution - a liquid solution that aids in removal of debris from contact lenses
    • Colored Lens - a contact lens with a tint or color added, either for handling/visibility purposes or to enhance or change eye color
    • ColorBlends - brand name of colored lenses, FreshLook ColorBlends
    • Cornea - referred to as the "window of the eye," it is the outermost layer of the eye
    • Corrective Lens - see contact lens
    • Contact Lens - thin plastic material designed to fit over the cornea for the correction of a refractive error
    • Cylinder - measurement of how much correction is needed for patients with astigmatism
    • Daily Wear Contact Lens - contact lenses that are worn for one day
    • Deposits - accumulations of substances (usually protein) onto the contact lens
    • Diameter - the width of the eye, measured in millimeters
    • Diopter - measurement unit of the refractive correction of a contact lens
    • Disinfecting Solution - used to disinfect contact lenses
    • Enzyme Cleaner Tablets or Solution - see Solution
    • Eye Care Provider (ECP) - see Optometrist, Opthalmologist, or Optician
    • Flat Medium - a base curve of 8.6 or 8.7
    • Farsightedness - see Hyperopia
    • Glaucoma - a condition in which the pressure inside the eye is elevated to a point that can damage the optic nerve and cause a loss of peripheral vision, or blindness
    • Hyperopia - a condition in which a person can see clearly at a distance but not up close
    • Light Filtering Tint - designed for sports use, these tints help objects stand out against a background
    • Monovision - technique to limit the effects of presbyopia by correcting one eye for hyperopia and the other for myopia
    • Multifocal - a contact lens with more than two viewing zones
    • Myopia - also known as nearsightedness, a condition in which a person can see clearly up close but not at a distance
    • Nearsightedness - see Myopia
    • OD - Oculus Dexter, Latin for right eye
    • OS - Oculus Sinister, Latin for left eye
    • Opthalmologist (MD) - medical doctor who specializes in eyes. Can perform exams, treat disease and perform surgery
    • Optician - not a medical doctor, but licensed to fit and dispense eyeglasses and contact lenses following written prescription from ophthalmologist or optometrist
    • Optometrist (OD) - performs exams, diagnoses and treats disease. In some areas they prescribe, fit and dispense eyeglasses and contact lenses
    • Oxygen Permeability - the amount of oxygen diffusing through contact lens material under specified testing conditions
    • Plano - non-prescription or 0.00 (zero) power
    • Power - see Sphere
    • Presbyopia - also known as farsightedness, a condition in which a person can see clearly at a distance but not up close
    • Rewetting Solution - used as a lubricant to increase comfort
    • RGP (Rigid Gas Permeable) lens - a contact lens made of slightly flexible plastics that allow oxygen to pass through to the eyes
    • Rinsing Solution - liquid solution that removes debris from contact lenses in preparation for use
    • Rx - prescription
    • Solution - there are many different types of solutions, made for different types of contact lenses
    • Sphere - a measurement of how much correction is needed, it is a number between -20 and +20
    • Steep edium - a base curve of 8.3 or 8.4
    • Tint - depending on the contact lens, there are different types of tint such as a handling or visibility tint, light filtering tint, enhancement tint or color tint
    • Toric - contact lens designed to correct astigmatism by bearing two different powers at right angles
    • Transitions - eyeglass lenses that change from light to dark based on UV rays and exposure to the sun
    • Visibility Tint - lightly tinted lenses for easier insertion and removal
    • Visitint ® - brand name, lightly tinted lenses for easier insertion and removal

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    Glasses

  • How to Read Your Eyeglass Prescription ?

    When you look at your eyeglass prescription (Rx) you will see a series of numbers in either a - or + form listed under different headings. Your right eye (OD) will be first and then your left eye (OS) underneath that. The first number written on your Rx will be the Sphere (SPH) . This is the amount of correction needed for the patient to see clearly.

    Minus powers (-)

    help those who are nearsighted (people that can see close up but need correction far away also known as Myopia).

    Plus powers (+)

    help those who are farsighted (people that can see far away but need correction to see close up also known as Hyperopia).

    For some people, their prescription stops there. This means they only need one power to correct their vision.

    If you have astigmatism then there will be 2 extra numbers written on your prescription, the cylinder (CYL) and axis. Astigmatism is a common condition where the eye is shaped more like a football giving it an asymmetric shape. Cylinder (CYL) is the amount of correction needed to correct astigmatism. Axis is a number between 1 and 180 written in degrees which is the precise location where the astigmatism is found.

    At a certain age, usually around 40, you will start to notice that reading and anything up close, may look blurry. To bring these things into focus you will need an additional plus power over your single vision prescription. This power will be listed on your prescription under the heading Add power. Sometimes the letters OU will be followed by your add power. OU is a term used to describe that both eyes have the same prescription.

    Your eyeglass prescription might also include another measurement called PD, which is short for pupillary distance. This is the measurement of the distance between the pupils in millimeters. In order to make your eyeglasses custom to your face we need to know the distance between your pupils so the centre of the eyeglass lens, which holds the clearest vision, sits directly in front of your pupil. If your prescription doesn't include your PD measurement you will need to measure it yourself since it is an important part of making eyeglasses.

  • How to Measure Your Pupillary Distance (PD)

    If your eyeglasses prescription does not indicate the PD measurement you will need to measure it yourself since PD is a required measurement when making eyeglasses.

    Follow these steps with a millimeter ruler to successfully measure your PD:
    1. Place a mm ruler up against your eyes, resting it on the bridge of your nose. Line up the starting point (0 mm) with your left (or right) pupil.
    2. This measurement is only accurate if you are looking straight ahead.
    3. Look at yourself in the mirror or have someone else read the ruler. If someone else is reading the ruler they must be at the same height as you.
    4. when the 0 mm mark on the ruler is lined up correctly on the left (or right) pupil the mark that lands in the center of the right (or left) pupil is your distance PD.
    5. Repeat these steps 2 or 3 times to make sure your results are accurate.
  • Lens Thickness
    • Standard 1.5 Plastic Single Vision
      • Recommended for Prescriptions from -2.00 to +2.00
      • Tintable
    • Thin Durable 1.59 Polycarbonate Single Vision
      • Recommended for Prescriptions from -4.00 to +4.00
      • Approx. 20% thinner than standard 1.5 plastic lenses
      • Tintable
    • Thin 1.61 Plastic Single Vision
      • Recommended for Prescriptions from -4.00 to +2.00
      • Approx. 25% thinner than standard 1.5 plastic lenses
      • Tintable
    • Thinner 1.67 Plastic Single Vision
      • Strongly Recommended for Prescriptions from -4.00 to -8.00
      • Approx. 40% thinner than standard 1.5 plastic lenses
    • Thinnest 1.74 Plastic Single Vision
      • Strongly Recommended for Prescriptions from -8.00 to -12.00
      • Approx. 50% thinner than standard 1.5 plastic lenses
  • Progressives versus Bifocals

    Progressive lenses, also known as "no-line bifocals", are more than just a defined near and distance correction in one lens like traditional lined bifocals. Instead, progressives provide a smooth transition from distance through intermediate to near, with all the in-between corrections included. As well, since there is no line on the lens, they look like regular lenses. This constant progression of prescription means that you can look up to see in the distance, look ahead to view things such as a computer screen in the intermediate zone (20 to 26 inches in front of you), and drop your gaze downward to read and do fine work comfortably close up.

  • Adaptation Period for Progressive Wearers

    Progressive lenses require training your brain to a different vision concept. This is called adaptation. For a lucky few, they adapt right away but for most people it may take a few days and even up to a month to adapt. This is completely normal, so we encourage you to give your new eyeglasses a chance.

    Tips on How to Adapt Faster

    • Leave New Glasses On The wearer should put their new progressive eyeglasses on and leave them on. There are many people that get progressives who have never worn glasses before so they have a hard time remembering to keep them on. The only way you are going to be successful is if you actually use their eyeglasses!
    • Don't Go Back and Forth The main reason why people cannot get used to their new progressive eyeglasses is because they go back and forth between their old eyeglasses and their new eyeglasses. Your old eyeglasses are always going to feel clearer and more comfortable at first because your brain is used to them. You need to wear the new progressive eyeglasses full time to allow your brain ample opportunity to adapt.
    • Look Through the Corridor During the adaptation process, you should point your nose to the object you want to look at. If they move your eyes only without moving your head, you will be looking through the distorted portion of the lens and vision will be blurry. Remember that clear vision is along the vertical corridor in the middle of the lens. Pointing your nose to the object will keep your eyes in the clear vision corridor. After a short while, the conscientious effort to point your nose to the target will become automatic.
    • Don't Give Up Don't give up if you don't adapt after a few days. It may take up to a month to fully adapt to a new pair of progressive lenses. Even if you have worn progressives before if may take time since all progressive designs are different.

    Contact Lenses

  • How does a Contact Lens Work?

    Contact lenses are a medical device, designed to fit right onto the cornea.

    Contact lenses can help reduce image distortion sometimes caused by eyeglasses, because they fit right onto the eye and offer increased peripheral vision. An Eye Care Practitioner needs to fit a patient for contact lenses, because all eyes are different sizes and all patients have different needs.

  • What types of Contact Lenses are Available?

    An Eye Care Practitioner is the only person that can recommend and prescribe a particular type of contact lens to a patient. However, there are different types of contact lenses available with slightly different purposes.

    Daily-wear soft lenses

    Made of soft, flexible plastics that allow oxygen to pass through to the eyes.

    • very short adaptation period
    • more comfortable and more difficult to dislodge than RGP lenses
    • available in tints and bifocals
    • great for active lifestyles

    Daily-wear disposable soft lenses

    Single-use, daily wear lens that are designed to be worn for a single day, discarded at night, and replaced with a brand new pair.

    • typically no lens care is required
    • assures fresh and clean lenses when replaced
    • great for active lifestyles

    Extended-wear soft lenses

    Available for overnight wear. Made of soft, flexible plastics that allow oxygen to pass through to the eyes.

    • can usually be worn without interruption, even while sleeping, up to a maximum number of days

    Frequent & planned replacement soft lenses

    Soft daily or extended wear lenses that are replaced on a planned schedule, normally every two weeks, monthly or quarterly.

    • assures fresh and clean lenses when replaced
    • available in most prescriptions
    • spare lenses conveniently on hand

    Rigid Gas Permeable (RGP)

    Made of slightly flexible plastics that allow oxygen to pass through to the eyes.

    • vision may be sharper than with soft contact lenses
    • easy to put on and to care for
    • durable with a relatively long life (1-2 years)
    • available in tints (for handling purposes)
    • daily-wear and extended-wear designs available
    • planned replacement schedule also available
  • How Long Does It Take a New Contact Lens Wearer to Get Used to Contact Lenses?

    Depending on a person's eye sensitivity and whether they have soft or rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses, it could take from one day to two weeks. If there is irritation, the wearer should contact their Eye Care Practitioner.

  • Which Way is the Right Way to Wear Contacts?

    Many first time wearers have questions about whether or not their contact lens is inside out. There is a way to tell-just place the contact lens on your finger so it's forming a cup, and hold it up directly in front of your eyes so you're looking at it from the side. If the edges are flared out, it's inside out; if it's forming a "U" shape, it's correct.

  • When Should Contact Lenses be Replaced?

    If contact lenses are still comfortable and in good condition beyond the recommended replacement schedule, it is still advisable to adhere to the wearing schedule prescribed. The main advantage of disposable lenses is that a fresh pair is worn daily or every couple of weeks.

  • Contact Lens Safety

    Doctors warn contact lens wearers not to share their contact lenses! Contact lenses are medical devices and are fitted to the specific patient's parameters. When shared or handled improperly, they can also transmit harmful bacteria that can lead to infection or other dangerous eye conditions.

    Patients should always follow their Eye Care Practitioner's advice on wear, care and disposal of contact lenses.

  • Recommendations for using your Contacts:

    DO:

    • Attend regular eye care checkups
    • Wash and dry hands prior to handling lenses
    • Clean, rinse and disinfect lenses after use (except daily disposable lenses, which should be discarded daily)
    • Air dry lens cases/storage cases and keep dry when not holding lenses
    • Insert lenses before applying makeup
    • Remove lenses before removing makeup
    • Replace lens cases/storage cases every 3 months to prevent contamination buildup
    • Have spare lenses and solutions on hand
    • Have an up-to-date pair of glasses available in case you need to remove your lenses

    DON'T:

    • Use tap water on lenses
    • Wet lenses with saliva
    • Reuse disinfecting solution - always discard and replace with new solution each time lenses are stored
    • Sleep in your lenses, unless specifically advised to by your Eye Care Practitioner
    • Switch the type of solution you use except on the advice of your Eye Care Practitioner
  • Cleaning and Storing Contact Lenses

    Contact lens wearers should always wash their hands before handling their lenses to avoid transferring dirt and germs to their eyes. They should also avoid moisturizing soaps, as they are not good for contacts. Hands should be dried with a lint-free towel.

    When one lens is removed, clean it with the recommended solution to remove eye-produced buildup, cosmetics, and other debris that impairs comfort. Some products require rubbing of the lens with a few drops of solution, while others only require rinsing. Rinsing is then required again to remove any loosened debris. Afterwards, the lenses can be placed in a clean lens case or holder, and filled with the appropriate solution for soaking and disinfection. Disinfection time varies, depending on product. These steps should be repeated for the other lens, and the lenses can be stored in the lens case.

  • Are Contact Lenses Suitable for Sports such as Swimming?

    Contact lenses can be the best vision correction option for athletes, enhancing visual skills like depth perception, peripheral awareness and eye/hand, eye/foot coordination. Unlike glasses, they offer a competitive advantage because they stay in place under dynamic conditions and eliminate the risk of injuries from eyeglasses.

    It is, however, best to not swim while wearing contact lenses, because of the bacteria in the water that can adhere to the lenses and cause infections. If lenses are worn while swimming, it is advisable to wear goggles over them and disinfect them immediately afterwards.

  • How do I read my Prescription?

    Prescriptions can be daunting at first glance. However, they contain standard elements that will help you determine which lenses and parameters to order.

    A standard prescription should include:

    Description OS (Left Eye) OD (Right Eye) Brand Name Name of Lenses. Acuvue 2 Acuvue 2 Power/Sphere A number between -20 and +20. -2.50 -2.75 Base Curve A number between 8.0 and 10.0 or a phrase, such as steep or flat 8.7 8.7 Diameter A number between 13.0 and 15.0. 14.0 14.0

    If the contact lens wearer has an astigmatism and needs toric lenses, it will also need to say:

    Description OS (Left Eye) OD (Right Eye) Cylinder A number between -4.00 and +4.00. -2.75 -1.50 Axis A number between 0 and 180. 180 95

    Doctors sometimes use short versions of the above words, such as "CYL" for cylinder or "SPH" for power/sphere. It is important that the prescription contain the brand name of the lenses, as different brand names are made with different materials.

  • What about Plano (non-prescription) Contact Lenses?

    Some contact lenses are available in plano (non-prescription). Sometimes, patients without a need for vision correction want to change their eye color by wearing these cosmetic colored or special effects lenses.

    While these lenses are termed as either cosmetic, non-prescription or plano, the wearer still needs to have an eye exam and contact lens fitting from an eye care provider because contact lenses are made from different materials, and the diameters and base curves are different sizes. What works for one patient might not work for another.

Guarantee

  • 110% Lowest Price Guarantee

    We guarantee that our prices are the lowest you'll find anywhere online. If you find a lower price on another website within 10 days after your purchase from LensWay.co.uk, we will refund you 110% of the difference up to the price of the item on our site.

    To receive the Lowest Price Guarantee store credit:

    • The product must have been purchased from LensWay and it must be the exact same product (manufacturer, brand name and parameters) on the lower priced online merchant.
    • The lower priced online merchant must have the product currently in stock and be an established site as determined by LensWay.
    • Shipping & handling charges, sales taxes and other charges (if any) will be included in determining the price difference.
    • This guarantee is limited to three claims in any 90-day period per customer and/or eight identical items per customer.
    • This guarantee can not be combined with any other coupon code/offer and does not apply to special effect/Halloween lenses, custom lenses, RGP or made-to-order lenses.
    • This offer is exclusive to contact lenses, eyeglasses are not eligible.

Warranty

  • Contact Lenses

    At LensWay, your satisfaction in our products is always guaranteed. We take great pride in our reputation for quality and excellent value.

    Our Contact Lenses Warranty:

    We guarantee that all of our lenses are factory sealed. If you have a problem with any lens purchased from us at any time, please remove the lens immediately and let us know. We will process your return as quickly as possible. Just follow the simple steps outlined in our return policy. If you suspect that your lenses are defective, please enclose a photocopy of your prescription when you return the lenses to us. If your lenses are determined to be defective by the manufacturer, we will issue a store credit.

  • Glasses

    At LensWay, your satisfaction in our products is always guaranteed. We take great pride in our reputation for quality and excellent value.

    Our Glasses Warranty:

    If you suspect that your glasses (frame or lenses) are defective, please let our Customer Care Team know and we will send you a pre-paid stamp for you to return the product to us. If your glasses are determined to be defective by the manufacturer, we will issue a new pair or a store credit to be used within 1 year of the purchase date.

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